Innocent or Guilty of Killing Police?

The Mumia Abu-Jamal- Controversy

Journalist Abu-Jamal had been a target of CoIntelPro. In 1980, at the age of 26, Mumia was elected president of the Philadelphia chapter of the National Association of Black Journalists. The following year, he was named one of the city’s “People to Watch” by Philadelphia Magazine. The article spoke of his “eloquent, often passionate and always insightful interviews.”  He had recently lost his radio journalist job with National Public Radio before he was accused of killing a Philadelphia police officer, Daniel Faulkner in 1981, who had served in the U. S. Army.  A debate continues, “Has Abu-Jamal been imprisoned justly or unjustly?”   He was sentenced to death but received a new capital sentencing hearing.  His  lawyer said that the results constituted “extraordinarily important new evidence that establishes clearly that the prosecutor and the Philadelphia

Mumia Abu-Jamal

Police Department were engaged in presenting knowingly false testimony“.  In this transcript, there is a comment by a witness that the police made her falsely testify against Mumia.  He was removed from death row in 2012, but was not granted a retrial.  Somecritics wonder why his younger brother, William Cook, did not testify on Jamal’s (born Wesley Cook) behalf at the 1982 trial.  He could not be found but witnessed the crime as he was driving the Volkswagen when Officer Faulkner pulled him over.  Abu-Jamal had been associated with and had given voice to the MOVE group to which thePhiladelphia Police Department was antagonistic.  In 1978, over 600 police raided MOVE’s home with guns and arrested Move-9.  All were sentenced to over 30 years in prison. Interestingly, Abu-Jamal was one of the reporters who covered this story. Mumia Abu-Jamal spoke out from the crowd of journalists, sharply raising questions about the way police had destroyed evidence after the raid. Through a call on the radio, Mumia aka “William Wellington Cole” got Judge Mahmed of the case to admit he had “no idea” who the murderer was, which highlighted the miscarriage of justice of the imprisonment of the MOVE-9.  Such acts earned him his grassroots moniker,The Voice of the Voiceless.

Reportedly, “A police report later that night shows that Civil Affairs inspector Fencl was quickly called into this investigation. Fencl was the same police official who gave the order to strip Black Panthers in the street in 1970 (and photographed for the papers to humiliate them before their convention), who planned the raid on MOVE’s Powelton home and who headed the political police unit that had spied on Mumia since he was 15…. In 1974 two pregnant women from MOVE were man-handled by cops until they miscarried. MOVE’s demonstrations intensified. The police responded with a campaign of “arrest on sight.” Between 1974 and 1976, there were 400 arrests of MOVE members, resulting in bail and fines of more than half a million dollars. Life Africa, a three-week-old baby, was killed during one violent police attack.”  Later in 1985, MOVE’s house was attacked and bombed by police, killing children, MOVE founderJohn Africa, and others while destroying over 50 homes.

Abu-Jamal wrote books, notably 1995’s Live from Death Row, which deals with prison, social and political issues.  There is a petition seeking his release. He is the subject of the song,Voice Of The Voiceless” by Rage Against the Machine.  A controversial film was made in 2010 by Tigre Hill.  Stephen Vittoria made a film about him, Long Distance Revolutionary.  You can follow @MumiaAbuJamal and @LDRMovie. Presidents Jacques Chirac of France and Nelson Mandela of South Africa, Foreign Ministers Kinkel of Germany and Derijcke of Belgium, and members of the Japanese Diet have urged the U.S. to grant Jamal a new trial. Officer Daniel Faulkner’s wife, Maureen, still contends that the rightfully convicted murderer of her husband is in jail.
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About Bren Martin

Brenda is an education advocate and has been an active leader in the schools, church and community. She is a National PTA Social Media Ambassador and was a Panelist on NBC's Education Nation in New York City, "Stepping Up: The Power of a Parent Advocate," for Parenting Magazine. Brenda was honored by the U. S. Department of Education and the White House as a “Champion of Change” for educational advocacy. She is Parenting Magazine’s Mom Congress-Kentucky delegate and a recipient of Knowledge Universe-KinderCare’s Education Achievement Award! (See Parenting Magazine’s, “The Power and Potential of Parent Advocates,“ and one of Brenda’s articles, “Changing Us, Changes Them.“) Some of her services include: District PTA President and State PTA Board; Education Commissioner's Steering Committee for Teacher Effectiveness. She is a former regional President, Gifted Education; Summer Camp Creator/Director; Church Youth Director; Vacation Bible School Director; Prichard Committee’s Commonwealth of Institute for Parent Leadership (CIPL) Fellow; School Based Decision Making; Employability Skills Consultant to prison & colleges; Television Special host and more. Also, Follow Brenda on Twitter @bdrumartin. Disclaimer: Use sites, blogs, information or links at your own risk.
This entry was posted in Advocacy, Civil Rights, Gun Violence, Revolutionary and tagged . Bookmark the permalink.

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